Life With Pink Princesses https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk A personal blog from the heart of a young Mum Wed, 12 Dec 2018 11:05:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0.1 98180168 Have We Finally Conquered The Milk Habit? https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk/have-we-finally-conquered-the-milk-habit/ https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk/have-we-finally-conquered-the-milk-habit/#comments Wed, 12 Dec 2018 11:00:00 +0000 https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk/?p=32004 For anybody new here, it’s probably best that I explain the situation right from the beginning as quickly as I can. Eva and Elsa have had a milk addiction. I actually think it was more of a bottle addiction, to be honest I’m not entirely sure. Both bottles and milk went hand in hand. Basically, …

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For anybody new here, it’s probably best that I explain the situation right from the beginning as quickly as I can. Eva and Elsa have had a milk addiction. I actually think it was more of a bottle addiction, to be honest I’m not entirely sure. Both bottles and milk went hand in hand.

Basically, wherever we went we had to take a bottle of milk with us. Eva actually conquered this problem when she turned three. So about two nearly three years ago. We stopped her taking bottles of milk everywhere when she started preschool but she’d still have it for nap times or sleep time.

It became a routine that Eva would call for me in the night, two and sometimes more times each and every night. She wanted a bottle of milk. I gave it to her. In my mind giving myself an easy life because she’d go straight back to sleep with no fuss. That routine had gone on for five years!!

Elsa sort of followed suit with this routine of taking bottles out. She never had a dummy and used the bottle as a comforter. She’d fall asleep with it hanging out of her mouth, she would request it when she felt nervous, if she was tired or just because.

It’s going to sound pathetic but it controlled our life a bit. If we didn’t have that bottle, a tantrum would occur. Karl and I would blame each other for not remembering to take it with us or to not take two or three with us. We even payed a ridiculous amount of money when in Florida for a room service of milk! Yes it was that bad.

Also may I add that when I say bottles, I’m not talking about a sippy cup or a beaker. I’m talking about a soft teat newborn baby bottle.

Elsa turned four in September and she was still so dependent on this stupid baby bottle of milk. I tried to switch her to a more grown up bottle so she could have her milk but the distressed behaviour just wasn’t worth it. So we carried on.

Although we’d reduced the amount of milk Elsa consumed during the day, and Eva was only having milk in bottles (actually her bottles are the harder teat style for a toddler) during the night time, I still felt totally ruled by this milk thing.

I’m not sure why or exactly when, but one evening I had just about had enough. I wanted to throw those bottles away. I felt like going cold turkey and throwing the girls a little in the deep end felt like the right way to do it.

So I took Elsa’s baby bottle away. Replacing it with the same bottle that Eva was having. I filled both Eva and Elsa’s bottles with water and braced myself for a tricky bedtime and night sleep.

Eva definitely took the news easier. She was a little grumpy but I promised she could have some milk in the morning if she didn’t call for me in the night and if she went to bed with water just like her big sister Freya.

There’s different types of cry a child can do; tantrums, pain, tiredness and many more. Elsa was distraught. She was generally devastated and hearing that type of cry for something so insignificant was awful. It broke my heart. I listened to her scream for about fifteen minutes before I couldn’t take it any longer.

I knew I wanted to kick this habit. This addiction. But for Elsa who had only known that as a comfort, it was going to need a little bit more thought. I came up with the plan to give her the baby bottle back but put water in it instead. Obviously she wasn’t happy and cried for a tiny bit longer but eventually she reasoned with me.

It took about a week for both girls to get used to the new rules. The new way of life for us. We are about three months in to it actually and we are all getting better sleep because they don’t expect their bottles to be refilled with milk.

Elsa is still using her baby bottle but only at night time. She doesn’t ask for it at all during the day now. She doesn’t ask for milk except in the morning when she first wakes up, when I of course fill her bottle half way as milk is still very important. She’s eating food better as she is no longer filled up with about nine bottles of nine ounces each day.

I’ve actually thrown out milk that’s gone off because we aren’t going through six pints in two days anymore. I don’t have to worry about taking a cool bag with me on days out. It’s been a huge weight lifted.

I’m still not sure how to get rid of that stupid baby bottle, but considering it’s just at night time, I’m not too bothered right now. I welcome tips though, so please let me know any tried and tested methods!!

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Debunking The Myths Of Foster Care https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk/debunking-the-myths-of-foster-care%ef%bb%bf/ https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk/debunking-the-myths-of-foster-care%ef%bb%bf/#respond Mon, 10 Dec 2018 13:19:37 +0000 https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk/?p=32631 You can find out more about whether you can foster here. As a country, we are crying out for more foster carers. There are over 70,000 children in care in the UK needing foster homes. Yet many suitable people are put off the idea of becoming a foster carer because they believe a myth. Let’s debunk …

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You can find out more about whether you can foster here. As a country, we are crying out for more foster carers. There are over 70,000 children in care in the UK needing foster homes. Yet many suitable people are put off the idea of becoming a foster carer because they believe a myth.

Let’s debunk the 10 most prevalent myths:

  • I’m too young:

Unlikely. The minimum age for being a foster carer is 21. What’s important is that you are able to offer the living arrangements suitable for a child in care, and provide the support they need

  • I’m too old:

There is no upper age limit on who can become a foster carer. More important than your age, is your willingness to take a child in,provide the care they need, and have the energy and personal health to do so. Part of the assessment will look at your physical capabilities, but age it self isn’t a barrier to becoming a foster carer.

  • I’m single:

Not a problem. You do not need to be in a relationship to be a foster carer. In fact, some children are more likely to thrive in care environments where there is just a single carer.

  • I’m gay:

Your sexuality bears no relevance to your ability to be a good foster carer. You will be assessed for your suitability just like a heterosexual foster carer.

  • My house is too small:

A child being placed will need a room of their own within your home. However, this doesn’t mean you need an enormous home. As long as you can provide a room for the child, equipped with the furniture they need,the size of your property is secondary to your ability to provide care.

  • I don’t own my own house

You don’t need to be a homeowner to be a foster carer. You can be a foster carer when living in rented accommodation, for example. As long as the child has physical space and security, the type of property and ownership is not important.

  • I’m not from the UK:

You will need to either have British citizenship or have permanent leave to stay in the UK. You don’t therefore, necessarily, have to be British, or have grown up here. It will, however, be important to support a child in their local community.

  • I’m not white:

Your race has no bearing on becoming a foster carer. In fact, we actively welcome applications to become a foster carer from the full spectrum of racial backgrounds in the UK. Where possible, it is important to place children within ethnically and culturally familiar households who understand things such as identity, discrimination and racism.

  • I’m male:

We welcome foster carer applications from men and women, both single and in partnerships. Once again, your suitability as a carer will be assessed with no relevance to your gender. Some children are better suited to placements with one or other gender, but it doesn’t stop you from becoming a foster carer and accepting other children.

  • I don’t have money:

We, and the government, recognise that undertaking foster care is costly. Raising children, particularly those in care, can require a high degree of resources. If you are in a couple then it is unlikely that both of you will need to stop any previous employment. However, you are also entitled to foster allowances and payments. These are aimed to meet the financial costs of a child in foster care, and provide you with a competitive income.

Becoming a foster carer is a rewarding option open to far more would-be carers than people realise. If we’ve debunked a myth for you, and you want to find out more about becoming a foster carer, call us on 0800 023 4561.

Disclosure: This is a collaborative post.

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Changing My Daughter’s Primary School https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk/changing-my-daughters-primary-school/ https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk/changing-my-daughters-primary-school/#comments Tue, 04 Dec 2018 09:00:12 +0000 https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk/?p=31794 It’s been really hard to sit and write about this. I want to be fully transparent whilst also protecting our daughters too. When you talk about your child’s school online you could be putting them at risk so it’s hard to talk openly without being open. I hope you get what I mean. It was …

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It’s been really hard to sit and write about this. I want to be fully transparent whilst also protecting our daughters too. When you talk about your child’s school online you could be putting them at risk so it’s hard to talk openly without being open. I hope you get what I mean.

It was weird. This whole situation came about in a weird way. I’ll try to start from the beginning but there’s so many paths that lead to the end destination. Over the past five years we’ve witnessed the school change completely. We’ve seen teachers come and go, the building itself was knocked down completely (well nearly anyway) and rebuilt.

Over the years things have frustrated us. The SENCO, the bullying, the lack of support, P1’s grades falling, chaotic disruption of the build. But nothing seemed drastic. Nothing was life threatening unlike when we moved P1 from her original school in Reception year. On our return back to school after the summer holidays we realised that so many people had left in both P1 and P2’s classes.

This raised Hubby’s ears a little. We started exploring the reasons behind the other children leaving and really questioning our own choices. We decided to visit some other schools in the area to get a feel. At this point I was still set on keeping the girls where they were as P3 was due to start next September and I’d finally have three in the same school for a whole year.

We first viewed a small village type school, that’s actually closer to our home. Instantly Hubby and I were blown away. It was colourful, friendly and welcoming. It was small, a huge contrast to the girls current school that has three classes in one year. This one we viewed had just one. A smaller school was always our plan for the girls, yet somehow we were in the biggest school in our area.

Hubby and I took the paperwork to fill in for an in year casual admission, then headed off for breakfast. We spoke about how excited we were. All the amazing opportunities this school was offering. That it would be a really positive change for the girls that would hopefully better their learning experiences.

It made me become more aware of their current schools flaws. The niggly things were now infuriating me and I felt less connected to the school I once loved and was loyal to. We filled in the applications to move the girls, was offered a place and had ten school days to accept it or not. This was when the stress and anxiety kicked in for both Hubby and me.

Day after day, hour after hour we both spent researching the potential new school. I scoured it’s website with a fine tooth comb. I googled “best schools” and we looked through all the publicised stats for performance. Eventually with just a day to spare, we decided against the move. Although this school is amazing, it was statistically performing the same as their current one. The move would have been hugely disruptive for possibly no better gain educationally.

Taking it back to the beginning, moving to Kent was fuelled by our want to give the girls a better education than we both had. Kent is known for being the home of some of the top schools in the United Kingdom. We are beyond lucky. The girls educations and learning experiences are so important to us and I’m not sure we realised just how much it meant to us until we started doing research and having conversations.

We didn’t actually know much about schools when we first moved. We didn’t know that P1’s first one would be so detrimental. When we moved her originally, we were limited to time and where had a place. I needed to get her to safety and I didn’t really care where as long as it wasn’t that original school.

Have I lost you yet?

Anyway, we decided against the move. But things were still worrying us. Researching, asking other people and viewing the other school had opened our minds to so many what ifs. It’s been so difficult because we are happy with the current school in a we’re not happy but we’re not unhappy kind of way.

Hubby had openly said he’d definitely move the girls if a better performing public school in the area had a space. So of course we started another enquiry into a different school, with no real rush to move them as we’d sort of settled ourselves back to the decision to keep them where they are.

After viewing a second school, Hubby and I were left confused. Completely baffled. It wasn’t a school that screamed out to us like the previous one. But it had different qualities. Qualities that ticked our “the best education” box. The school has impressive stats, impressive grounds, impressive building, it’s a Christian school with a strong religious ethos and a want to get the best from all pupils.

We applied for places for both P1 and P2. Although we wanted desperately for them to attend this school for the future of their educational journeys, we were actually much more reluctant than I thought we would be. They only had one space. A space for P1 in Year 5. The waiting list for P2 is about thirteen children long, however she would be put on the top of the list due to the siblings criteria if we moved P1.

It was never in our plan to put ourselves in a position that would make our lives a hell of a lot trickier. Three children with three different places to be all in the space of about fifteen minutes. For me this was probably the hardest part of our decision to move any of the girls. Hubby felt very worried about leaving P2 in the current school and the actual time it may take to get her a space.

Both of us were pretty terrified about this change. It’s human to worry about change. I think?

We researched further. Discussed our pros and cons of both the new and the current school. Ultimately we both wanted the girls to receive the best quality of education to help set them up for a bright future. With the newer school performing much better it felt like a no brainer to move them, albeit it only being one of them.

So although we are generally quite happy with the “old” school. P2 is doing very well there but it’s been difficult for P1 who has encountered many issues during her time there.

We sent back our forms to accept the place for P1 at the new school and were given a start date. When you read this P1 will have already been in her new school, hopefully settling well. As I’m writing this, I’m worried about how we’ll manage three school runs, three different diary dates and how we’ll help P1 adjust to this huge change.

I’m sad that I’ll not be seeing some of my mummy friends that I’ve made as often as I spread myself between three places. But I know that we’ve made the best and right decision for our family and I have to keep remembering that.

I want to write further about this topic which I hope you’ll come back to read.

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Ideas For Family Bonding This Holiday Season https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk/ideas-for-family-bonding-this-holiday-season/ https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk/ideas-for-family-bonding-this-holiday-season/#respond Mon, 03 Dec 2018 07:00:14 +0000 https://lifewithpinkprincesses.co.uk/?p=32270 No holiday is like the previous one, especially for families that are ageing slowly together. In each festive season, you’ll find your loved ones growing, learning and experiencing life in new ways. The holiday season can truly be a chance to cement in place what connects your family, and to celebrate the mere fact that …

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No holiday is like the previous one, especially for families that are ageing slowly together. In each festive season, you’ll find your loved ones growing, learning and experiencing life in new ways. The holiday season can truly be a chance to cement in place what connects your family, and to celebrate the mere fact that you have each other. The Christmas break is not just about fun and relaxation: it’s an opportunity to explore creativity – an exploration that can help your children achieve happiness, fulfilment, curiosity and fun, while the parents look on with loving smiles and warmth in their hearts. This article looks at three ways you can bring your family even closer together as the festive season rolls around again.

  1. Be Thankful

Even though there is a lot on your mind, and many things in life might be far from perfect, it would be unfair of you to neglect your loved ones, especially during a period reserved for family bonding. Sometimes you get lost in the stresses of work or the responsibilities of adulthood, and you forget to notice all the beauty inside your home and your family.

Life takes us all in different directions, and the holidays are a chance for us to remember that we have the most valuable thing we could ever ask for: each other. That’s why being thankful makes these magical moments sweep away all the stresses of life, giving you deeper appreciation.

  1. Take the Family on Vacation

 Being thankful and appreciative is only part of caring for your family. If you have time off, the finest joys of life are those in which you’re able to create unforgettable memories for you and your family. You can reward yourself and your family by finding that special place of joy after periods of stress or strife. You deserve it, and they do, too.

Instead of spending the holiday in the hallways of the regular routine of your life, make it special by going somewhere different and unique. You’ll find villas in Mallorca, for instance, that are private and intimate in just the right way for your family to come together in joy and love.

  1. Become Closer and More Joyous 

We sometimes forget that we’re always building relationships with those around us, and that’s especially true and important when it comes to your immediate family. Your holiday season is an excellent opportunity for you to overcome whatever invisible barriers have been accumulating between you and your loved ones. It’s a time to take the initiative to set new standards of closeness and to really hold your family dear, near and close to your heart.

The holiday season is also the perfect excuse for you to bring that feel-good festive cheer into your home and spread it between your family members. Don’t neglect your distant family, who may be feeling lonely over the Christmas period: invite them over, or at the very least schedule a Skype call so that your family can share in the good tidings over the holidays.

Use this festive season to get even closer to your family by following the tips outlined above.

Disclosure: This is a collaborative post.

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